Cleartune User Guide

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Basically, the 441.5 Hz is misleading. It's not the frequency of anything that's relevant. It's an artifact left over from the days before when tuners supported cents.
Orchestras sometimes tune to different standards. They use the concert pitch of A to define those standards. Some orchestras tune to A=438 Hz, some tune to A=441 Hz, etc. It's like someone yells 'give me an A', the leader plays an A and everyone tunes their A to it. Then everyone fine tunes their individual instrument, and the orchestra is in tune.
Chromatic tuners were originally designed to tune orchestras.
In modern popular music, 'A' is (almost) always 440 Hz. If you listen to 440 Hz and then listen to 441 Hz, you might not hear any difference. 441 Hz is only 4 cents sharp of 440 Hz. The difference is 1/25 of a semitone. They are both 'A' notes. 441.5 Hz is not an F# note - it's still an A.
Cleartune User GuideUser
the math geek in me wrote:
In just intonation, an 'E' note is 3/4 the frequency of 'A' in just intonation. 440 x 3/4 is 330 Hz. But it's also 500 cents below A in equal temperament. If you tune your E after calibrating to A=440 Hz, the tuner app display should show the center line for E to be 329.6 Hz. In other words, there's a slight difference between the perfect E and the equal tempered E.
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Cleartune User Guide


Hz readings for notes other than 'A' are very confusing, and they serve no practical purpose. You should calibrate the tuner to A=440 Hz and just ignore Hz readings from there on. Do all of your tuning in cents.
Hz is a scientific measurement (cycles per second). Cents is a musical measurement (1/100th of a semitone). Hz is used to calibrate the tuner. Beyond that, tuning any other note to the Hz scale is bogus. Unless you're real good at math and science, an instrument should be tuned in cents.
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